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Posted on | June 1, 2013|No Comments
Posted by The Photography Post

No byline? Unauthorized use? Don’t know what to do with outtakes? Our columnist and image licensing expert Rebecca Couche has the answers. Got a question you need answered? Please put your issue in the subject line, and email Rebecca at rebecca@thephotographypost.com.

Q: I’ve been working professionally as a photographer for the last 8 years, and feel that my archive is quite sellable. I’ve shot everything from food to celebrities. I want to start making my archive work for me and syndicate, what are my options? James, UWS

If you have a big archive covering a lot of genres, and you just want to earn some extra money on all of it, I would suggest pairing up with one of the bigger stock agencies. However, if there is one aspect of your income that’s particularly special to you, or one you’d like to see placed with a bit more care (celebrity could be this one) then it’s best to go to a more boutique agency where clients go for specific image needs – chances are, they can also give your work a bit more thought when placing it.

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Posted on | May 1, 2013|No Comments
Posted by The Photography Post

No byline? Unauthorized use? Don’t know what to do with outtakes? Our columnist and image licensing expert Rebecca Couche has the answers. Got a question you need answered? Please put your issue in the subject line, and email Rebecca at rebecca@thephotographypost.com.

Q: I completed a celebrity shoot that appeared in a newspaper in the UK three months ago, and my syndication agency told me that the publicist had “killed” the shoot. What does this mean, and is there anything I can do about it? Sarah, UK

Ah, shame. If you’ve signed a PR agreement, the buck stops here. This means that the publicist for one reason or another, no longer wants the published images to be used. Talk with your agent to see if they have any feedback for you, perhaps it’s something specific about the image, and if you are lucky, you might have some outtakes with a totally different look that the PR might approve of. Even if you haven’t signed a PR agreement, if you choose to run the images, you risk straining a relationship and that’s not going to help you much moving forward. If you don’t have any outtakes, the only thing that could save the shoot is if the celebrity gets a new publicist at some stage, and likes your work. Stranger things have happened?

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Posted on | April 1, 2013|No Comments
Posted by The Photography Post

No byline? Unauthorized use? Don’t know what to do with outtakes? Our columnist and image licensing expert Rebecca Couche has the answers. Got a question you need answered? Please put your issue in the subject line, and email Rebecca at rebecca@thephotographypost.com.

Q: I did a shoot for a popular monthly magazine with a celebrity, and the magazine didn’t use any of the images. I still got paid, so it is a good outcome overall, but I’m disappointed because I was hoping for some great exposure from this shoot. Can I sell the images to someone else? Nina, East Village, NY

A: Theoretically, depending on any agreements you’ve signed, yes you can. However, PR people are really in control, and you don’t want to get them offside by selling a picture of their client to an unauthorized publication. It could mess up whatever exclusive placement they have in the works, and make your relationship with that publicist strained moving forward. So what this means, is if you get an interested magazine or outlet, yes, you can absolutely sell it, but try to get the PR approval. If you have a syndication agent, they should be able to guide you through this process, and if they are any good – they should be respectful of that relationship.
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Posted on | March 1, 2013|No Comments
Posted by The Photography Post

No byline? Unauthorized use? Don’t know what to do with outtakes? Our columnist and image licensing expert Rebecca Couche has the answers. Got a question you need answered? Please put your issue in the subject line, and email Rebecca at rebecca@thephotographypost.com.

Q: I’ve seen my images in a magazine, but I was never contacted for permission. I don’t mind the exposure, but I haven’t been credited, so it all seems a bit pointless. What are my options? Sam, Brooklyn, NY

A: The first step is to contact the magazine via email, let them know that you own the copyright to the image. You should then be entitled to a fee for use of the image and a correction credit in an upcoming issue. How you navigate this depends on what you want to get out of the situation. If it’s a good magazine, and one you want to work for, you could use the situation as leverage to secure further syndication, or perhaps even a commissioned shoot.
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Posted on | February 1, 2013|No Comments
Posted by The Photography Post

Rebecca Couche The Photography Post magazines

If you are sitting on a small mountain of hard drives loaded with all your work, and you’re not licensing your work, you could be missing out on some good fortune. TPP talks with licensing expert Rebecca Couche about how syndicating means more than just extra cash.

What is the reason why photographers would want to license their work?

The most tangible reason is that it’s more money for work you’ve already done, and hopefully been paid for. The close second best reason for licensing your work is that it gets your name out to different markets, putting your work across the desks of photo editors all over the world, opening up the door to further editorial commissions and ad work.

Can you still control where your work goes?

It’s a good point. There’s a difference between appearing in a respectable, but unknown to you, newspaper supplement and a trashy, and also unknown to you, tabloid. An agent who specializes in syndication can help you with this.

What do you look for in an agent?

A solid appreciation for photography is important, as are contacts with outlets and publicists. Now that online and ipad versions of magazines and books are established as the only way forward, skills in that area are really useful. I feel a background in magazines, or photo editing also really helps. Ideally you need someone who has good experience, and an appreciation for your work, and where you want to take it.

What’s the best way to get started?

Do some research and check out the different types of work the agencies have. You want to fit in with their roster, but not blend in. If your specialty is celebrity portraits, go to where photo editors go to get that material.

What are some of the considerations photographer can make when shooting to make it successful syndication-wise?

It’s hard  for a photographer to be putting in serious consideration into the syndication life of an image while doing the job for another client, but trying to put some more accessible images into the mix is always good.

Like outtakes?

Yes exactly. Outtakes are a boon for photographers, especially for those with good celebrity shoots. Fashion magazines all want high-end celebrity images, but celebrities are busy people and they don’t make time for shoots for everyone – especially magazines based in smaller countries. If you have unpublished outtakes, and the PR likes them – then there’s a deal.

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Posted on | July 30, 2012|No Comments
Posted by The Photography Post

Friend of TPP, Ashley Simpson, recently skyped with photographer Vicente De Paulo on the eve of his commissioned project for Visionaire and Paddle8.

Picture 43

Museum of Contemporary Art (MAC), Niteroi, 1991

He was the one to shape the original Brazil,” says Brazilian photographer Vicente De Paulo of 104 year-old architect and Rio native Oscar Niemeyer. The architect, renowned for his curvaceous, concrete Modernist designs, is the focus of a special commissioned project by Visionaire and Paddle8, which debuts on the art retail site this week and will come to life in Visionaire’s RIO issue, out this September. The collaboration features ten 3D photographs of several of Niemeyer’s most iconic cites—including exterior views of the sensuous Gustavo Campana Palace and images the city’s famous hyperboloid Cathedral—, all shot by De Paulo. “Because Brazilia is my hometown and I had never done a project about the city, I was very excited to be able to go there and shoot those buildings,” explains the 46-year-old photographer. “Niemeyer brings to Rio this whole glamour because he was based here and did so much. The whole world paid attention.  He gave us not just an identity, but the icon of what the symbol of what the Brazilian lifestyle means.

Picture 40

Cathedral of Brasilia, Brasilia, 1958

Picture 41

Cathedral of Brasilia, Brasilia, 1958

Picture 44

Itamaraty Palace (Ministry of External Relations), Brasilia, 1962

Photography Courtesy Vicente de Paulo

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Posted on | August 10, 2011|No Comments
Posted by Rachel Hulin

tumblr_lmkv01bJXc1qbnjwc

This is a still. And this is the video. I’ve been waiting for some really subtle landscape video, and this one is checking all the boxes.

Thanks, Grant Cornett.

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Posted on | July 7, 2011|No Comments
Posted by Rachel Hulin

I realize we’ve had a bit of a hiatus lately over here on TPP, but I’m pulled out of retirement by some really staggering work by Manjari Sharma. In this age of instagram, it’s rare to see something truly new and groundbreaking, especially as it pertains to the photographic medium itself.

Enter Manjari Sharma’s Darshan. Named for a Sanskrit word which means “sight”, “vision” or “view, Manjari’s new project seeks to photographically recreate nine classical images of Hindu Gods and Goddesses. These icons are deeply connected to Sharma’s spiritual upbringing. By melding them with her reverence and devotion to photography, she is creating altars of her own.

You’ll never believe what goes into making these images. It’s a full-on production of costume designers, set stylists, jewelry designers, carpenters and painters. Sharma believes art is much about the process, and this is one hell of a process.

This is the first image, Maa Laxmi, the goddess of wealth, good fortune, and prosperity.

Here is more about the project, and an amazing behind-the-scenes look at the work as it is created:

Darshan from Manjari Sharma on Vimeo.

PLEASE consider donating to Sharma’s project. These images ought to be created. Click here and help out! You can even receive a signed, editioned print. Totally worth it, this is an excellent use of Kickstarter.

Here is more from Sharma in her own words:

“I grew up in a Hindu home to parents who were quite spiritual, religious and god fearing as they would call it in India. I visited countless temples, shrines, and discourses as frequently as my parents wanted. These discourses circled around unraveling the mysteries locked in chapters of mythological enigma and tales of deities, reincarnations and astrology. The roots of hindu mythology run deep; my own experiences as a child ranged from being fascinated and enlightened to lost and still seeking. Naturally, coming back home still consists of delving back into the same routine of worship and meditation I left behind.

I moved from India to the United States in 2001 in order to pursue an undergraduate study in Fine Art Photography. The frequency with which I visited Hindu temples in what felt like my previous life, gradually got replaced with visits to art galleries, museums and studios, where creativity in all mediums of expression are revered.

This series bridges two parts of my world. Iconography in the Indian religion found in temples and scriptures are ultimately artistic representations of mythological characters. Most hindus have seen the use of painting and sculpture but rarely photography taken to the level of exacting measures with respect to showcasing deities. The creation of these images has become my act of devotion, to art and to religion.”

Go to Manjari Sharma’s site.

Go to Kickstarter and be inspired.

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Posted on | May 25, 2011|55 Comments
Posted by The Photography Post

TPP recently sat down with the dashing Alberto Milazzo of LaBoutique NY to discuss the state of the art… of retouching.


Before

After

TPP: How did you get started in the industry and where?

AM: I’ve been a retoucher for 9 years. I originally went into Graphic Design and went to school for it in the UK, I liked it but I started enjoying manipulating images and incorporating them in my design pieces more than the actual “designing” of the project. So after I was done I did a lot of self teaching at home, while I was working for Blockbuster Video and trying to break into acting. My agent told me to go get some headshots. I went to a photographer they recommended and turns out, he was in need of of a graphic designer/digital retoucher to set up his new digital department. I jumped at the chance. Acting quickly became secondary, and after I had proven my worth, I ended up working full time for him. I started retouching wedding shots and drool off of baby’s mouths – and I loved it.

As I retouched more, I became faster and more confident. Through that job I started meeting other photographers and was suddenly thrust into the industry where I learned a lot, fast. After a couple of years there I started freelancing for the big boys and really got my face out there to whomever had a minute to see me. As I grew my skill base I also grew a portfolio, which was starting to circulate… even all the way across the seas to NYC.

I got a call from a friend who had moved there and were in need of good retouchers. To my surprise, they offered me a freelance gig in NYC. I was on the plane before I could say yes. Two weeks later the company offered me a sponsorship and a full time job. That was 5 years ago and I have worked very hard in the industry since then and have worked with many professional photographers, clients and fellow retouchers.

TPP: You are one of the most sought after retouchers in the business – what would you say is your philosophy when taking on a new client or project?

AM: Clear, concise and honest communication. I take direction very well and its all down to taking the time to listen and asking the questions that will lead to a great image, story or campaign. I have also taken the time to grow strength in previously tough areas such as product retouching, which is more technical and precise when compared to fashion or beauty. I am a well rounded retoucher. Another huge advantage when working with new clients is knowing when I need to put my ego aside. This industry can lead anyone with a creative streak or skill to question their abilities or to get personally effected by an unhappy client. You can’t please everyone. I do my best and apply all that I have learned plus a dash of passion & commitment into what I’m working on. I believe this is key when meeting a new client or starting a project.

TPP: You clearly take a creative approach to retouching – what/whom are your current influences/inspirations?

AM: There are many photographers that I admire and who inspire me. To name a few in an otherwise long list; there’s Guy Aroch, Mert & Marcus Piggott, Richard Avedon, Ben Hassett and Tyen. I find myself being inspired by so many of the images that I see both consciously and subconsciously. I mentally log a specific color, a certain density, a particular contrast or palette they use when I retouch, this enables me to stay focused on new trends and augment my skill base to keep up with the demands of new and existing clients. It is very important for a retoucher to be versatile , you need to remain as unbiased with your technique or/and creative opinion, to stay as flexible as possible when tending and respecting one photographer’s style to another.

TPP: A lot is changing in the photo industry right now – what are some of the current challenges facing the retouching industry right now?

AM: A lot has changed, this is definitely true. I have seen a huge shift in the 9 years I’ve been working as a professional retoucher. One of the biggest changes I’ve seen is the lack of boutique-style retouching that I was originally taught in London – to sit with either the client or photographer when working. At least for the first or second ’round’ – to build a solid working relationship whereby making sure that no markup-up or direction is lost in translation. These days all a clients need to do is call and upload files and instruct a retoucher to “do the usual”. This can be very challenging and sometimes arduous. I struggled with this for a while until I managed to shift my way of working to suit this “in and out” method which is also brought on by small retouching budgets. No one wants to pay for good retouching anymore it seems. It pains me to see a wonderfully shot subject or story by a talented photographer ruined by sloppy cheap retouching.

TPP: I know retouchers get crazy requests – without naming names, can you tell us about some or one of the most outrageous/challenging requests you’ve had?

AM: I have retouched many celebrities. I have worked with all sorts of clients. Among the usual head switching, body shaping, acne removal and skin coloring, here are a handful of the most absurd comments and requests I have encountered : “Make her look like a Barbie doll”, “This is one image needs to be composed from 32 shots”, “Make her breasts look natural”,”lets change her skin color, I’d like her to look latin”, “Whatever you do, DO NOT touch the mole on the face, its her trademark”, “I don’t like her body shape, use body from a shots of (another person) and lets see” ( After 13 rounds of changes ), “I still don’t like it, lets go back to the first round and start over” and my favorite of all time : “We need to change her face completely, she looks awful, but its important that she still looks like her as her fans won’t recognize her”.

TPP: Any before and after’s you can show us? If so, can you walk us through your strategy in approaching this image?

AM: It is generally understood that showing any before and afters of work a retoucher has been paid for is out of the question, so, I took the liberty of shooting someone myself to show a typical beauty before & after. As you can see, its a huge difference. I chose a beauty image because they typically involve a lot more skin work, hence the dramatic difference. This is only scratching the surface of how different some images end up looking after rounds and rounds of changes. Here I started shaping the face, more symmetrical ( considered more attractive ), Then I moved on to some light general color moves and density/contrast shifts to generate a pleasant result. Then comes the skin and hair work which takes the most amount of time. There are a few techniques for retouching skin, I choose the ‘dogde and burn’ method in Photoshop, which was originally used in film photography to manipulate exposure of a selected area(s) on an exposed print. Dodging decreases the exposure for areas of the print that the photographer wishes to be lighter, while burning increases the exposure to areas of the print that should be darker. I use this to lighten unwanted shadows, a blemish mark, brightening up eyes or to enhance shine of lips or to darken a bright spot etc. For this particular image I had to completely replace her left eye from another shot, the original eye was too dark and the shape was unflattering.


Before

After

TPP: Retouching is so much about staying ahead of current trends and technology. Can you tell us a little bit about how you stay on top of these developments?

AM: I am always in a constant state of absorption. A vast amount of information is presented to me daily from my clients. The camera equipment used for a particular shot, the lighting effects as well as particular color choices are all part of a photographers style. Knowing your client/photographer, their work, and what they expect from you is important in understanding the trends that are being set. As far as technology goes, it is imperative to stay current. I am always reading articles online about emerging products that will aid or change the industry. I try to stay on top o fall the latest camera technology, hardware to software… it can get exhausting when the industry perpetually pumps out new products throughout the year. I also find it imperative that if in fact some new product emerges that we incorporate it onto our practice if I feel it will benefit me or my clients. For example: In the studio we use EIZO screens. Theses screens are the top of their class. They allow consistency with color and give one of the best monitor-to-print matches around. Color calibration and consistency/prepress industry standards are crucial to the retouching industry. With technology such as this we are able to deliver more accurate results to our clients.

TPP: What is your favorite tool in Photoshop and why?

AM: Without a breath of hesitation, my favorite tool in photo shop is known as “curves” which is a color adjustment tool. The reason is simple: I love color. Whether you are looking at a photograph, a work of art, or out your window color is what makes the world around us interesting. Having the curve adjustment tool gives me the option to change the color and intensity of any given image and/or area. Its comparable to giving someone a blank canvas and an infinite amount of color and saying… Have at it! This tool allows me to set the mood of an image by making color moves. I can make the image warm, cool, give it the appearance of being vintage, or poppy and fresh regardless of the images subject matter which I find exciting. Color is everything!

TPP: Any advice for anyone who is interested in becoming a retoucher?

AM: I know so many different people from all walks of life who enter into this industry. In all honesty I believe it is a career choice that most retouchers fall into. For instance I studied graphic design and photography, and for me the transition was predictable. However, I know of some very successful and talented retouchers who have emerged from the hairdressing business, music and modeling industries. To my knowledge there are no decent retouching classes available. If there are, and I am mistaken, I would just like to ask where are all the good retouchers? I mean it is very hard to find a skilled and talented retoucher. Anyone can buy a copy of Photoshop and learn the basics by means of one vehicle or another but there is so much more to retouching than software or hardware. There is a sensibility involved, knowing just how far to push a color, a pixel, or even someone’s nose. Coupling tact with technique is key. The greatest advice I can give to someone is to cultivate your abilities through practice after learning the basics, and to not become to greedy with Photoshop; develop the sense to know when to stop pushing an image and you’re already in the right direction. Have fun with it!

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Posted on | May 11, 2011|No Comments
Posted by Rachel Hulin

Stephen Yang recently sent over some images from the month he spent documenting the recent uprising in Egypt. Check out a sampling of the work below. and see many more here.

SY_Egypt-1

A view looking east towards Cairo Tower, the Nile river and Ramses St.

SY_Egypt-2

Crowds gather in protest at Tahrir Sq on April 1st 2011.

SY_Egypt-3

Karnak Temple in Luxor, Egypt.

SY_Egypt-4

A man directs his children to salute for onlookers in Tahrir Sq.

SY_Egypt-5

Adel Adris, 34, Libyan revolutionary and photographer. He came to Cairo to distribute his photographs and meet with journalists.

SY_Egypt-6

Ahmed Diaa, 22, about to enter into the military. Ahmed shows a photograph of himself after he was detained and beaten for 20 hours by the police during the 25 of January protests.

Sarah El Gammal, 23, from Heliopolis a northern district of Cairo.

Sarah El Gammal, 23, from Heliopolis a northern district of Cairo.

Policemen gather along the Nile near the national TV station to protest working conditions on March 22nd, 2011.

Policemen gather along the Nile near the national TV station to protest working conditions on March 22nd, 2011.

Remy Gamal, 26, from Giza.

Remy Gamal, 26, from Giza.

A woman leaves the Sadat subway station in downtown Cairo.

A woman leaves the Sadat subway station in downtown Cairo.

People gathering in Tahir Sq. to show solidarity with the movement.

People gathering in Tahrir Sq. to show solidarity with the movement.

Hamada, 26, on his falucca in Luxor, Egypt.

Hamada, 26, on his falucca in Luxor, Egypt.

A houseboat on the Nile in Luxor, Egypt.

A houseboat on the Nile in Luxor, Egypt.

Arwis Mahmoud, 26, stands in a field near his house on the west bank of Luxor, Egypt.

Arwis Mahmoud, 26, stands in a field near his house on the west bank of Luxor, Egypt.

Abdoullah Ahmed Ali, 30, in his village near Luxor, Egypt.

Abdoullah Ahmed Ali, 30, in his village near Luxor, Egypt.

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Posted on | April 20, 2011|No Comments
Posted by Rachel Hulin

restrepo_junger_hetherington

Terrible, shocking news today, with the report that much beloved photographer Tim Hethering more...

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Posted on | March 31, 2011|153 Comments
Posted by Kate Steciw

1. There’s a lot going on in Philadelphia (Philthy to those who dare) this weekend. My main p more...

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Posted on | March 18, 2011|97 Comments
Posted by Kate Steciw

This is the sixth installment in a conversation series initiated by Lucas Blalock with conte more...

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Posted on | March 14, 2011|No Comments
Posted by Rachel Hulin

Oh hello there, reader. We have an exciting announcement about a new feature here at TPP: A J more...

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Posted on | March 9, 2011|No Comments
Posted by Rachel Hulin

Have you heard about the Graflex cameras with the Polaroid backs? A fellow by the name of Joh more...

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Posted on | March 3, 2011|72 Comments
Posted by Kate Steciw

1. Humble Arts Foundation & Chelsea Art Museum present The Collector’s Guide to New Art Pho more...

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Posted on | February 28, 2011|No Comments
Posted by Rachel Hulin

I’ve known Lauren Lancaster and her work for some time, but I just saw her website again rece more...

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Posted on | February 28, 2011|No Comments
Posted by Rachel Hulin

Thank god for clever thinkers like Andy Adams who keep us on our toes and remind us to be awa more...

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Posted on | February 25, 2011|81 Comments
Posted by Kate Steciw

1. THE SHOW MUST GO ON, the final show at Capricious Space opens TONIGHT and includes work by more...

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Posted on | February 24, 2011|No Comments
Posted by Rachel Hulin

Hallo, old friends. I’m sorry I’ve been so absent lately. I went away to birth a baby. And th more...

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Posted on | February 11, 2011|70 Comments
Posted by Kate Steciw

As a Friday before Valentine’s day treat, I thought I’d share the work of some of our favorit more...

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Posted on | February 11, 2011|93 Comments
Posted by Kate Steciw

1. At the Barbican Gallery in London, Brooklyn-based Cory Arcangel has an installation featur more...

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Posted on | February 3, 2011|No Comments
Posted by Kate Steciw

1. Don’t miss Sam Fallssolo show, Everything Keeps Being Nothing at Higher Pictures,Opens  more...

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Posted on | January 12, 2011|No Comments
Posted by Rachel Hulin

Chris Leaman is the staff photographer for Washingtonian Magazine, and recently was able to s more...

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Posted on | January 12, 2011|74 Comments
Posted by Kate Steciw

This is the fifth installment in a conversation series initiated by Lucas Blalock with conte more...

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Posted on | January 12, 2011|87 Comments
Posted by Kate Steciw

1. Check out Dan McCarthy’s Calvary at Journal Gallery in Brooklyn 6-9pm.

2. TRESSPASS opens more...

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Posted on | January 5, 2011|No Comments
Posted by Rachel Hulin

Manjari Sharma has had a great year. A breakout star with her highly lauded and publicized Sh more...

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Posted on | January 5, 2011|66 Comments
Posted by Kate Steciw

1. Foam Magazine’s annual Talent Call is now open. “We are looking for the world’s next photo more...

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Posted on | January 4, 2011|No Comments
Posted by Rachel Hulin

Ross Taylor has a new blog, The Image, Deconstructed, whose purpose is to tell the story behi more...

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Posted on | December 23, 2010|No Comments
Posted by Rachel Hulin

2010 was a year of flower torture. Some cruel things were done to them. Martin Klimas led the more...

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Posted on | December 17, 2010|85 Comments
Posted by Kate Steciw

1. Picture Books is A F.L.O.A.T collaboration with four Independent Photography Book publish more...

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Posted on | December 17, 2010|No Comments
Posted by Rachel Hulin

I have two prizes to give out today, based on tireless research and observations I have made  more...

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Posted on | December 10, 2010|No Comments
Posted by Rachel Hulin

palmer-farmer-600

Alfred Palmer, TVA Douglas Dam, Tennessee, June 1942

You know I’m a sucker for for the Off more...

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Posted on | December 9, 2010|No Comments
Posted by Kate Steciw

This is the fourth installment in a conversation series initiated by Lucas Blalock with conte more...

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Posted on | December 3, 2010|No Comments
Posted by Rachel Hulin

I’m incredibly taken with Richard Mosse‘s project Infra, which I’ve just seen for the  more...

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Posted on | December 1, 2010|48 Comments
Posted by Kate Steciw

1. The NYC launch of SLIDELUCK will take place on Wednesday, December 8th at the lovely Sandb more...

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Posted on | November 30, 2010|282 Comments
Posted by Kate Steciw

Amelia Bauer recently go tin touch to tell us about a lovely new series she has in the works. more...

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Posted on | November 24, 2010|96 Comments
Posted by Kate Steciw

1. In an effort to help support the photographers who have been featured on Fraction Magazine more...

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Posted on | November 17, 2010|No Comments
Posted by Rachel Hulin

Even Chuck Close has difficult clients. Apparently Brad Pitt made him work for it.

Chuck Clo more...

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Posted on | November 16, 2010|91 Comments
Posted by Kate Steciw

1. Skye Parrott’s solo show, First Love, Last Rights opens at Capricious Space this Friday. C more...

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Posted on | November 12, 2010|No Comments
Posted by Rachel Hulin

Kudos to Nike, for letting Tim Barber do his Tim Barber thing for a major ad campaign, comple more...

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Posted on | November 11, 2010|95 Comments
Posted by Kate Steciw

1. First of all, help our friends over at Humble Arts raise an additional $925 for Manual Tra more...

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Posted on | November 4, 2010|No Comments
Posted by Rachel Hulin

When Amy Stein tweets, we listen. And here’s what she said, JUST NOW (erm, a few hours ago. I more...

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Posted on | November 3, 2010|45 Comments
Posted by Kate Steciw

1. TONIGHT! Panel Discussion: LaToya Ruby Frazier, Michael Wolf, Susan Bright “Contemporary D more...

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Posted on | October 28, 2010|No Comments
Posted by Rachel Hulin

There are some really interesting pictures that have just been released from the Chilean mine more...

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Posted on | October 27, 2010|56 Comments
Posted by Kate Steciw

1. “Our friends at Artists Wanted SCOPE Art Show and 3rd Ward have joined forces to present more...

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Posted on | October 26, 2010|57 Comments
Posted by Kate Steciw

Rachel and I are really excited to be included in an excellent group show opening this Thursd more...

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Posted on | October 22, 2010|No Comments
Posted by Rachel Hulin

I am still googly eyed over this portrait of Tony Kushner by Christian Weber for New York Mag more...

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Posted on | October 21, 2010|115 Comments
Posted by The Photography Post

TPP checks in with our favorite artists on their inspiration, work in progress and studio pra more...

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Posted on | October 19, 2010|102 Comments
Posted by Kate Steciw

1. TOMORROW, Apex Art hosts “What Dickens Drank” an intriguing attempt to answer “What did a  more...

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